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The "Touton" stone

The stone names the Germanic tribe of the Toutons. Because the inscription of six lines is not complete, however, it is not possible to solve the riddle of its meaning. J. Röder could prove that the stone was made by a talented stone-breaker. However, the stone mason did not have much practice or knowledge: the work does not match with the style and tradition of a Roman craftsman.

The stone's function is not clear and there are no parallels to other finds. The word "INTER" appears to indicate a function as border stone, but apart from the Toutons no other tribes are named. Some researchers believe the stone is a fake from the 11th century.

Location
In 1878 at the peak of the Greinberg, outside the earthen banks and south of the temple, the stone was found by lumbermen. It was located at the site where W. Conrady believed it had been hewn out of the rock. Examinations by J. Röder indicate that the material originates from Greinberg, but was not cut from the rock directly at the site. The stone was worked on, displayed and inscribed at the site.

Archaeology
A 4.75m high, slender, pointed stone of red sandstone, 0.50m wide at the base, irrecular cross-section.
Inscription:
INTER / TOVTONOS / C / A / H / I
(CIL XII, 6610)

Literature
Röder 1960. Röder 1967.

Links

Römerweg Miltenberg

Lupa Nr. 6922

"Touton stone", Museum der Stadt Miltenberg
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1 "Touton stone", Museum der Stadt Miltenberg © Boundary Productions, Photo Eric Dobat

Bavarian State Conservation Office Landesstelle für die nichtstaatlichen Museen & Bavarian State Archaeological Collection with the support of the Bayerische Sparkassenstiftung